Jharkhand General Knowledge Yearbook 2020

Jharkhand General Knowledge Yearbook 2020: It gives us immense pleasure in presenting the Jharkhand Current Affairs Yearbook 2020, Useful for JKPSC and all other competitive exams. This book deals with the relevant features and topics of Current affairs of State in a systematic and comprehensive manner by the use of simple and concise language for easy and quick understanding. We hope that the readers will find this book user friendly and helpful in preparation of their examinations. I look forwarded to have the views, comment, suggestions and criticism from readers which would definitely help in further improvement of the Book. I would like to heartfelt thanks to all my team members for their efforts to prepare this book. Jharkhand GK Yearbook 2020

Jharkhand Current Affairs Yearbook 2020

1. Introduction of Jharkhand (Static GK)

2. Current Affairs (whole year)

Jharkhand Current Affairs/General Knowledge Yearbook 2020 has become an integral part of a lot of entrance exams being conducted at the graduate and under-graduate levels. It is very important for students to remain updated on the current happenings in their surroundings especially those that are important from the perspective of state. Current Affairs Yearbook 2020, a thoroughly revised, reorganised, updated and ENLARGED edition, presents a comprehensive study of all the sections that are covered under the subject of General Knowledge. The Yearbook 2020 provides the latest information & most authentic data reference material on Current Affairs and General Knowledge. It has specially been designed to cater to aspirants of various competitive exams like JKPSC and Other Jharkhand PSC Civil services exams across the state. The material has been written in a lucid language and prepared as per the requirements of the various competitive exams. Jharkhand GK Yearbook 2020

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Current Affairs consists of latest news/ information about Jharkhand based on The Hindu, Indian Express, PIB, Yojana, People, Events, Ideas and Issues across the Social, Economic & Political climate of the State.

Must Have for Multiple Reasons: The Current Affairs Mega Yearbook 2020 is a Must-Have book for all kinds of Objective & Descriptive Tests, Essay Writing and Group Discussions & Personal Interviews, The Jharkhand General Knowledge section provides crisp and to-the-point information in Geography, History, Polity, Economy, General Science, etc. which otherwise could be very exhaustive. Jharkhand GK Yearbook 2020

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Jharkhand GK Yearbook 2020 - Jharkhand PSC Current Affairs Yearbook 2020

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Introduction of Jharkhand

Jharkhand is a state in eastern India, created on 15 November 2000, from what was previously the southern half of Bihar. The state shares its border with the states of Bihar to the north, Uttar Pradesh to the northwest, Chhattisgarh to the west, Odisha to the south and West Bengal to the east. It has an area of 79,710 km2. It is the 15th largest state by area, and the 14th largest by population. Hindi is the official language of the state. The city of Ranchi is its capital and Dumka its sub capital. The state is known for its waterfalls, hills and holy places; Baidyanath Dham, Parasnath and Rajrappa are major religious sites.

Jharkhand is located in the eastern part of India and is enclosed by Bihar to the northern side, Chhattisgarh and Uttar Pradesh to the western side, Odisha to the southern part and West Bengal to the eastern part.

The region has been inhabited since the Mesolithic-Chalcolithic period, as shown by several ancient cave paintings. Even evidence of use of iron started in this region as early as 1400 BCE. The region was under the rule of many sovereign and autonomous ruling dynasties including Maurya, Gupta, Gauda, Pala, Nagavanshi, Khayaravala, Ramgarh Raj, Raksel, Chero and Kharagdiha Zamindari estates. Jharkhand GK Yearbook 2020

In the 16th century Mughal influence reached the region, and it finally came under the East India Company in the 18th century. After the Independence of India, the region became part of Bihar state. There was demand for a separate state in the region and the Bihar Reorganisation Act, 2000 passed in Parliament, giving rise to the new state of Jharkhand.

Jharkhand suffers from what is sometimes termed a resource curse: it accounts for more than 40% of the mineral resources of India, but 39.1% of its population is below the poverty line and 19.6% of children under five years of age are malnourished. The state is primarily rural, with only 24% of the population living in cities. Jharkhand is among the leading states in economic growth. In 2017-18, the GSDP growth rate of state was at 10.22%.

Stone tools have been discovered from Chota Nagpur plateau region which is from Mesolithic and Neolithic period. There are ancient cave paintings in Isko, Hazaribagh district which are from Meso-chalcolithic period (9,000-5,000 BC). In Kabra-Kala mound at the confluence of Son and North Koel rivers in Palamu district various antiquities and art objects have found which are from Neolithic to the medieval period and the pot-sherds of Red ware, black and red ware, black ware, black slipped ware and NBP ware are from Chalcolithic to the late medieval period. Several iron slags, microliths, and potsherds have been discovered from Singhbhum district which are from 1400 BCE according to carbon dating age. The region was ruled by many empires and dynasties including Maurya, Gupta, Gauda, Pala, Nagavanshi, Khayaravala, Ramgarh Raj, Raksel, Chero, and notable Kharagdiha Zamindari estates of Koderma, Ledo Gadi, Gandey Gadi and Gadi Palganj.

During the age of Mahajanpadas around 500 BC, Jharkhand state was a part of Magadha and Anga. In the Mauryan period, this region was ruled by a number of states, which were collectively known as the Atavika (forest) states. These states accepted the suzerainty of the Maurya Empire during Ashoka’s reign (c. 232 BCE). Samudragupta, while marching through the present-day Chotanagpur region, directed the first attack against the kingdom of Dakshina Kosala in the Mahanadi valley. In the 7th century, Chinese traveller Xuanzang passed through the region. He described the kingdom as Karnasuvarna and Shashanka as its ruler. To the north of Karn-Suberna was Magadha, Champa was in east, Mahendra in the west and Orissa in the south.

During medieval period, the region ruled by Nagavanshi, Khayaravala and Chero ruler. The Mughal influence reached Palamu during the reign of Emperor Akbar when it was invaded by Raja Mansingh in 1574. Several invasions took place during Mughal rule. During region of Nagavanshi King Madhu Singh, Akbar’ general invaded Khukhra. Also there was invasion during region of Durjan Sal. Jharkhand GK Yearbook 2020

The King Medini Ray ruled from 1658 to 1674 in Palamau. His rule extended to areas in South Gaya and Hazaribagh. He attacked Navratangarh and defeated the Nagavanshi Maharaja of Chhotanagpur. The Chero rule in Palamu region lasted till 19th CE, until internal conflict between various factions weakened the Cheros and they were defeated by the East India Company. Later Palamu estate was sold by the British.

Region under Kings of Chero dynasty, Nagavanshi dynasty, Ramgarh and Kharagdiha became parts of territories of East India Company. Ramgarh Raj along with estates of other chiefs in the regions was permanently settled as Zamindari estate. The Kharagdiha Rajas were settled as Rajas of Raj Dhanwar in 1809, and the Kharagdiha gadis were separately settled as zamindari estates. Some of the notable Kharagdiha Zamindari estates were Koderma, Gadi Palganj and Ledo Gadi. Jharkhand GK Yearbook 2020

Region under Kings of Chero dynasty, Nagavanshi dynasty, Ramgarh and Kharagdiha became parts of territories of East India Company. Ramgarh Raj along with estates of other chiefs in the regions was permanently settled as Zamindari estate. The Kharagdiha Rajas were settled as Rajas of Raj Dhanwar in 1809, and the Kharagdiha gadis were separately settled as zamindari estates. Some of the notable Kharagdiha Zamindari estates were Koderma, Gadi Palganj and Ledo Gadi.

The subjugation and colonisation of Jharkhand region by the British East India Company resulted in spontaneous resistance from the local people. The first revolt against the British East India Company was led by Raghunath Mahato, in 1769.

In 1771, the revolt against the landlords and the British government was led by Tilka Manjhi, a Paharia leader in Rajmahal Hills. Soon after in 1779, the Bhumij tribes rose in arms against the British rule in Manbhum, in 1807, the Oraons in Barway murdered their landlord from Srinagar. Munda tribe rose in revolt in 1811 and 1813. Bakhtar Say and Mundal Singh, two landowners, fought against the British East India Company in 1812. Jharkhand GK Yearbook 2020

The Princely states in Chota Nagpur Plateau came within the sphere of influence of the Maratha Empire, but they became tributary states of British East India Company as a result of the Anglo-Maratha Wars known as Chota Nagpur Tributary States.

Thakur Vishwanath Shahdeo, Pandey Ganpat Rai rebelled against British East India Company in 1857 rebellion. In Battle of Chatra conflict took place between rebel and East India Company. Tikait Umrao Singh, Sheikh Bhikhari, Nadir Ali, Jai Mangal Singh played pivotal role in the Indian Rebellion of 1857.

After the Indian Rebellion of 1857, the rule of the British East India Company was transferred to the Crown in the person of Queen Victoria, who, in 1876, was proclaimed Empress of India. The Cheros and Kharwars again rebelled against the British in 1882 but the attack was repulsed. Then Birsa Munda revolt broke out in 1895 and lasted till 1900. The revolt though mainly concentrated in the Munda belt of Khunti, Tamar, Sarwada and Bandgaon:

In October 1905, the exercise of British influence over the predominantly Hindi-speaking states of Chang Bhakar, Jashpur, Koriya, Surguja, and Udaipur was transferred from the Bengal government to that of the Central Provinces, while the two Oriya-speaking states of Gangpur and Bonai were attached to the Orissa Tributary States, leaving only Kharsawan and Saraikela answerable to the Bengal governor.

In 1936, all nine states were transferred to the Eastern States Agency, the officials of which came under the direct authority of the Governor-General of India, rather than under that of any provinces.

In March 1940, INC 53rd Session was accomplished under the presidency of Maulana Abul Qalam Azad at Jhanda Chowk, Ramgarh now Ramgarh Cantonment. Mahatma Gandhi, Jawaharlal Nehru, Sardar Patel, Dr. Rajendra Prasad, Sarojini Naidu, Khan Abdul Ghaffar Khan, Acharya J.B. Kripalani, Industrialist Jamnalal Bajaj and others greats leaders of Indian freedom movement attended the Ramgarh Session. Mahatma Gandhi also opened khadi and village Industries Exhibition at Ramgarh.

After Indian independence in 1947, the rulers of the states chose to accede to the Dominion of India. Changbhakar, Jashpur, Koriya, Surguja and Udaipur later became part of Madhya Pradesh state, but Gangpur and Bonai became part of Orissa state, and Kharsawan and Saraikela part of Bihar state. In 1912, the state of Jharkhand was first proposed by a student of St. Columba’s College in Hazaribagh. Initially, in 1928, it was demand of Unnati Samaj, political wing of Christian Tribals Association, which submitted a memorandum to Simon Commission to constitute a tribal state in eastern India. Prominent leader like Jaipal Singh Munda and Ram Narayan Singh demanded a separate state. Jharkhand Party led by Jaipal Singh Munda submitted memorandum to States Reorganization Commission for Jharkhand state, but it was rejected due to there was many languages and no link language in the region, tribal were not in majority and adverse effects on economy after separation from Bihar. In 1972, Binod Bihari Mahato, Shibu Soren and A. K. Roy founded Jharkhand Mukti Morcha. Nirmal Mahto founded All Jharkhand Students Union. They spearheaded movement for separate state of Jharkhand. AJSU introduced elements of violence in the movement and called for bycott of election while JMM opposed it. Due to differences these party parted away from each other. There was a provision for limited internal autonomy in the hill area of Assam. Other tribal areas were covered by the fifth schedule of the constitution. Chotanagpur and Santal Pargana development board constituted under the chairmanship of then Chief minister of Bihar under the provinsion of fifth schedule in 1972. It failed to meet desire result. Jharkhand co-ordination committee (JCC) led by Ram Dayal Munda, Dr. B.P. Keshri, Binod Bihari Mahato, Santosh Rana and Suraj Singh Besra started fresh initiative in the matter. Dr. B.P Keshri sent memorandum to form Jharkhand state. Centre government formed a committee on Jharkhand matter in 1989. It stressed the need of greater allocation of the development funds for the area. Jharkhand Area Autonomous Council (JAAC) Bill passed in Bihar legislative assembly in December 1994. Jharkhand Area Autonomous Council (JAAC) has given charge of 40 subjects including Agriculture, rural health, public work, public health and minerals. The council has power to recommend for legislation to the Assembly through the state government and to frames bylaws and regulations. Jharkhand GK Yearbook 2020

In 1998, when the separate state movement was falling apart, Justice Lal Pingley Nath Shahdeo had led the movement. In 1998, the Union government decided to send the bill concerning formation of Jharkhand state to Bihar Legislative Assembly to which Lalu Prasad Yadav had said that the state would be divided over his dead body. A total of 16 political parties including BJP, JMM, AJSU and Congress came in one platform and formed the ‘All Party Separate State Formation Committee’ to start the movement. Shahdeo was elected as the convener of the committee. The voting on Jharkhand Act was to be done on 21 September 1998 in Bihar legislation. On that day the committee, under the leadership of Shahdeo called for Jharkhand Bandh and organised a protest march. Thousands of supporters of separate state took to streets in leadership of Shahdeo. He was arrested and detained in police station for hours along with many supporters.

After the last Assembly election in the state resulted in a hung assembly, RJD’s dependence on the Congress extended support on the precondition that RJD would not pose a hurdle to the passage of the Bihar reorganisation Bill. Finally, with the support from both RJD and Congress, the ruling coalition at the Centre led by the BJP which had made statehood its main poll plank in the region in successive polls earlier, cleared the Bihar reorganisation Bill in the monsoon session of the Parliament this year, thus paving the way for the creation of a separate Jharkhand state. NDA formed the government and Babu Lal Marandi took the oath of chief minister on 15 November 2000 on the birth anniversary of tribal leader Birsa Munda. Jharkhand GK Yearbook 2020

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MPPSC Madhya Pradesh Current Affairs Yearbook 2020

Madhya Pradesh Current Affairs Yearbook 2020, Useful for MPPSC and all other competitive exams. This book deals with the relevant features and topics of Current affairs of State in a systematic and comprehensive manner by the use of simple and concise language for easy and quick understanding. We hope that the readers will find this book user friendly and helpful in preparation of their examinations. I look forwarded to have the views, comment, suggestions and criticism from readers which would definitely help in further improvement of the Book. I would like to heartfelt thanks to all my team members for their efforts to prepare this book.

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Madhya Pradesh Current Affairs/General Knowledge Yearbook 2020 has become an integral part of a lot of entrance exams being conducted at the graduate and under-graduate levels. It is very important for students to remain updated on the current happenings in their surroundings especially those that are important from the perspective of state. Current Affairs Yearbook 2020, a thoroughly revised, reorganised, updated and ENLARGED edition, presents a comprehensive study of all the sections that are covered under the subject of General Knowledge. The Yearbook 2020 provides the latest information & most authentic data reference material on Current Affairs and General Knowledge. It has specially been designed to cater to aspirants of various competitive exams like MPPSC and Other Madhya Pradesh State PSC Civil services Exams across the State. The material has been written in a lucid language and prepared as per the requirements of the various competitive exams. MPPSC Madhya Pradesh Current Affairs Yearbook 2020

General Awareness/Current Affairs Yearbook 2020

Indian Economy Current Affairs Yearbook 2020

Indian and World Geography Current Affairs Yearbook 2020

Indian Polity Current Affairs Yearbook 2020

Indian History: Latest Current Affairs Yearbook 2020

Current Affairs consists of latest news/ information about Madhya Pradesh based on The Hindu, Indian Express, PIB, Yojana, People, Events, Ideas and Issues across the Social, Economic & Political climate of the State.

Why should you buy this Book?

Latest and Authentic information must for All Competitive Exams – The Mega Current Affairs Yearbook 2020 provides the latest information & most authentic data reference material on current Affairs and General Knowledge. It has specially been designed to cater to aspirants of various competitive exams like Civil services, MPPSC and Other Madhya Pradesh PSC exams across the State.

Student-Friendly Presentation – The material has been given in bulleted points wherever necessary to make the content easy to grasp. The book has ample tabular charts, mind Maps, Graphic Illustrations which further makes the learning process flexible and interesting. MPPSC Madhya Pradesh Current Affairs Yearbook 2020

Must Have for Multiple Reasons: The Current Affairs Mega Yearbook 2020 is a Must-Have book for all kinds of Objective & Descriptive Tests, Essay Writing and Group Discussions & Personal Interviews, The Madhya Pradesh General Knowledge section provides crisp and to-the-point information in Geography, History, Polity, Economy, General Science, etc. which otherwise could be very exhaustive.

MPPSC Madhya Pradesh Yearbook 2020

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Madhya Pradesh Yearbook 2020

1. Introduction of M.P.

2. Latest Govt. Schemes

3. Latest Budget and Important Points

4. Current Affairs

5. Practice MCQ

Introduction of Madhya Pradesh

Madhya Pradesh is situated in the central region of India and that’s why it is called the Heartland State. It has the largest reserves of diamond and copper in India as Madhya Pradesh is rich in mineral resources. It came into existence in 1956. It experiences sub-tropical climate. Hot dry summer is from April to June and Monsoon Rains are from July to September. There are all total 52 districts present in Madhya Pradesh. It has 92% of Hindus and around and the remaining 8% are Muslim, Jain, Christian, Sikhs and Buddhists.

Madhya Pradesh is also known as the Tiger state of India. The state came into existence on 1 November 1956. It is the 2nd largest state by an area and 5th by is population. After Independence Madhya Pradesh was created with Nagpur as its capital, in 1956, Madhya Pradesh was recognized and Bhopal makes its capital. Madhya Pradesh was the largest area state in India until 2000 when the Chhattisgarh region was made as a separate state. MPPSC Madhya Pradesh Current Affairs Yearbook 2020

Madhya Pradesh literally means “Central Province”, and is located in the geographic heart of India, between latitude 21.2°N-26.87°N and longitude 74°59′-82°06′ E. The state straddles the Narmada River, which runs east and west between the Vindhya and Satpura ranges; these ranges and the Narmada are the traditional boundary between the north and south of India. The highest point in Madhya Pradesh is Dhupgarh, with an elevation of 1,350 m.

It is bordered on the west by Gujarat, on the northwest by Rajasthan, on the northeast by Uttar Pradesh, on the east by Chhattisgarh, and on the south by Maharashtra.

The State has a subtropical climate. Like most of north India, it has a hot dry summer (April–June), followed by monsoon rains (July–September) and a cool and relatively dry winter. The average rainfall is about 1,371 mm. The southeastern districts have the heaviest rainfall, some places receiving as much as 2,150 mm, while the western and northwestern districts receive 1,000 mm or less.

It is the second largest state in India after Rajasthan with an area of 3, 08, 000 sq. km. It is a part of peninsular plateau of India lying in north central part, whose boundary can be classified in the north by the plains of Ganga-Yamuna, in the west by the Aravali, east by the Chhattisgarh plain and in the south by the Tapti valley and the plateau of Maharashtra.

CGPSC Chhattisgarh Yearbook 2020 : Latest Current Affairs

BPSC Bihar Yearbook 2020 : Latest And Current Affairs

APSC Assam Yearbook 2020 : Latest Current Affairs

APPSC Andhra Pradesh Yearbook 2020 : Current Affairs

Madhya Pradesh is a state in central India. Its capital is Bhopal, and the largest city is Indore, with Gwalior, Jabalpur and Ujjain being the other major cities. Madhya Pradesh is the second largest Indian state by area and the fifth largest state by population with over 75 million residents. It borders the states of Uttar Pradesh to the northeast, Chhattisgarh to the southeast, Maharashtra to the south, Gujarat to the west, and Rajasthan to the northwest. Before 2000, when Chhattisgarh was a part of Madhya Pradesh, Madhya Pradesh was the largest state in India and the distance between the two furthest points inside the state, Singoli and Konta, was 1500 km. The area covered by the present-day Madhya Pradesh includes the area of the ancient Avanti Mahajanapada, whose capital Ujjain (also known as Avantika) arose as a major city during the second wave of Indian urbanisation in the sixth century BCE. Subsequently, the region was ruled by the major dynasties of India. By the early 18th century, the region was divided into several small kingdoms which were captured by the British and incorporated into Central Provinces and Berar and the Central India Agency. After India’s independence, Madhya Pradesh state was created with Nagpur as its capital: this state included the southern parts of the present-day Madhya Pradesh and northeastern portion of today’s Maharashtra. In 1956, this state was reorganised and its parts were combined with the states of Madhya Bharat, Vindhya Pradesh and Bhopal to form the new Madhya Pradesh state, the Marathi-speaking Vidarbha region was removed and merged with the then Bombay State. This state was the largest in India by area until 2000, when its southeastern Chhattisgarh region was made as a separate state. MPPSC Madhya Pradesh Current Affairs Yearbook 2020

The interesting and unique tool stone-age tools have been discovered from the Narmada river valley. Rock shelter and cave painting which can be dated to 30,000 BCE have been discovered at a no. of places. Arunachal Pradesh was ruled by Maurya Empire (Ashoka of Magadha) in the 3rd century BC.

It was made Indias 25th State on 30th May 1987, the largest city of Madhya Pradesh in Indore. The History of Madhya Pradesh divided into 3-Time period. During this period the region was dominated by the Maurya, Nanda and Gupt.

The city of Ujjain arose as a major centre in the region, during the second wave of Indian urbanisation in the sixth century BCE. It served as the capital of the Avanti kingdom Tejas. Other kingdoms mentioned in ancient epics—Malava, Karusha, Dasarna and Nishada—have also been identified with parts of Madhya Pradesh.

Chandragupta Maurya united northern India around 320 BCE, establishing the Mauryan Empire, which included all of modern-day Madhya Pradesh. Ashoka the greatest of Mauryan rulers brought the region under firmer control. After the decline of the Maurya Empire, the region was contested among the Sakas, the Kushanas, the Satavahanas, and several local dynasties during the 1st to 3rd centuries CE. Heliodorus, the Greek Ambassador to the court of the Shunga king Bhagabhadra erected the Heliodorus pillar near Vidisha.

S.No Description Answer
1. Founded on 1 November 1956
2. Capital Formation 1 November 1956
3. Largest city Indore
4. Also Known as Heart of India
5. Ruled By Mauryan Empire, Malava, Dasarna, Nishada  Karusha
6. Major Historical Events The merger of Bhopal into Union of India (1949) MP comes into existence (1956) first non-Cong government (1967) Discovery of Narmada man (1982) Bhopal gas tragedy (1984) Division of MP (2000)

Dams

  • Highest dam of Indirasagar Dam.
  • The second highest dam of Bargi Dam.
  • Longest dam of Bargi Dam.
  • Largest power generating dam Omkareshwar Dam 520 MW.
Dams River Length  Height  Capacity  Location Open
Indirasagar Dam Narmada River 653 m (2,142 ft) 92m (302 ft) 9,890,701 acre·ft Khandwa district 2006
Bargi Dam Narmada River 5357 m 69.80 m 3,920 million m3 Jabalpur
District
1988
Ban Sagar Dam Sone River 1,020 m (3,350 ft) 67 m (220 ft) 2,000,000 acre-feet (2.5 km3) shahdol 2006
Gandhi Sagar Dam Chambal River 514 metres (1,686 ft) 62.17 metres (204.0 ft) 5,936,000 acre
⋅ft
Mandsaur District 1960
Madikheda Dam Sindh River 1070 m 62 m 901 million m3 Shivpuri
district
2008
Tawa Dam Tawa River 1,815 m 57.91 m 9,890,701 acre·ft. Hoshangabad District  1974
Rivers Originates From Falls or Meet Total Length City
Narmada Anuppur Hugli river 1070 Km Jabalpur Barwani, Harda, Hoshangabad, Omkareshwar, Narmada Nagar, Dewas
Chambal Indore Yamuna River 965 Km  Kota
Betwa river Bhopal  Yamuna River 380 km Bhopal, Gwalior, Jhansi, Jaluan
Tapti Betul Arabian Sea 724 Km
Son Amarkantak Ganga river 784 km Sidhi, Dehri, Patna
Shipra North of Dhar district Chambal River 195 Km Ujjain, Ratlam, Dhar, Mandsaur
Kali Sindh Bagli Chambal River 150 Km Indore, Bhopal.
Tawa Betul  District Narmada River 172 Km Hoshangabad District

Ujjain emerged as the predominant commercial centre of western India from the first century BCE, located on the trade routes between the Ganges plain and India’s Arabian Sea ports. The Satavahana dynasty of the northern Deccan and the Saka dynasty of the Western Satraps fought for the control of Madhya Pradesh during the 1st to 3rd centuries CE.

The Satavahana king Gautamiputra Satakarni inflicted a crushing defeat upon the Saka rulers and conquered parts of Malwa and Gujarat in the 2nd century CE. MPPSC Madhya Pradesh Current Affairs Yearbook 2020

Subsequently, the region came under the control of the Gupta Empire in the 4th and 5th centuries, and their southern neighbours, the Vakataka’s. The rock-cut temples at Bagh Caves in the Kukshi tehsil of the Dhar district attest to the presence of the Gupta dynasty in the region, supported by the testimony of a Badwani inscription dated to the year of 487 CE. The attacks of the Hephthalites or White Huns brought about the collapse of the Gupta Empire, which broke up into smaller states. The king Yasodharman of Malwa defeated the Huns in 528, ending their expansion. Later, Harsha (c. 590–647) ruled the northern parts of the state. Malwa was ruled by the south Indian Rashtrakuta Dynasty from the late 8th century to the 10th century. When the south Indian Emperor Govinda III of the Rashtrakuta dynasty annexed Malwa, he set up the family of one of his subordinates there, who took the name of Paramara. MPPSC Madhya Pradesh Current Affairs Yearbook 2020

The Medieval period saw the rise of the Rajput clans, including the Paramaras of Malwa and the Chandelas of Bundelkhand. The Chandellas built the majestic Hindu-Jain temples at Khajuraho, which represent the culmination of Hindu temple architecture in Central India. The Gurjara-Pratihara dynasty also held sway in northern and western Madhya Pradesh at this time. It also left some monuments of architectural value in Gwalior. Southern parts of Madhya Pradesh like Malwa were several times invaded by the south Indian Western Chalukya Empire which imposed its rule on the Paramara kingdom of Malwa. The Paramara king Bhoja (c. 1010–1060) was a renowned polymath. The small Gond kingdoms emerged in the Gondwana and Mahakoshal regions of the state. Northern Madhya Pradesh was conquered by the Turkic Delhi Sultanate in the 13th century. After the collapse of the Delhi Sultanate at the end of the 14th century, independent regional kingdoms re-emerged, including the Tomara kingdom of Gwalior and the Muslim Sultanate of Malwa, with its capital at Mandu.

The Malwa Sultanate was conquered by the Sultanate of Gujarat in 1531. In the 1540s, most parts of the state fell to Sher Shah Suri, and subsequently to the Hindu king Hemu. Hemu, who had earlier served as the General of the Suri dynasty, operated from the Gwalior Fort during 1553–56 and became the ruler of Delhi as a Vikramaditya king winning 22 battles continuously from Bengal to Gujrat and defeating Akbar’s forces in the Battle of Delhi on 7 October 1556. However, he chose Delhi as his capital after his formal Coronation and left Gwalior. After Hemu’s defeat by Akbar at the Second Battle of Panipat in 1556, most of Madhya Pradesh came under the Mughal rule. Gondwana and Mahakoshal remained under the control of Gond kings, who acknowledged Mughal supremacy but enjoyed virtual autonomy. MPPSC Madhya Pradesh Current Affairs Yearbook 2020

CGPSC Chhattisgarh Yearbook 2020 : Latest Current Affairs

It gives us immense pleasure in presenting the Chhattisgarh Current Affairs Yearbook 2020, Useful for CGPSC State PSC and all other competitive exams CGPSC Chhattisgarh Yearbook 2020. This book deals with the relevant features and topics of CGPSC Chhattisgarh Yearbook 2020 Current affairs of State in a systematic and comprehensive manner by the use of simple and concise language for easy and quick understanding. We hope that the readers will find this book user friendly and helpful in preparation of their examinations. I look forwarded to have the views, comment, suggestions and criticism from readers which would definitely help in further improvement of the Book. I would like to heartfelt thanks to all my team members for their efforts to prepare this book. CGPSC Chhattisgarh Yearbook 2020

UPSC IAS Prelims 2020 Online 60 Days Programme

Chhattisgarh Current Affairs/General Knowledge Yearbook 2020 has become an integral part of a lot of entrance exams being conducted at the graduate and under-graduate levels. It is very important for students to remain updated on the current happenings in their surroundings especially those that are important from the perspective of state. Current Affairs Yearbook 2020, a thoroughly revised, reorganised, updated and ENLARGED edition, presents a comprehensive study of all the sections that are covered under the subject of General Knowledge. The Yearbook 2020 provides the latest information & most authentic data reference material on Current Affairs and General Knowledge. It has specially been designed to cater to aspirants of various competitive exams like CGSC and Other Chhattisgarh State PSC Civil services Exams across the State. The material has been written in a lucid language and prepared as per the requirements of the various competitive exams. CGPSC Chhattisgarh Yearbook 2020

Current Affairs consists of latest news/ information about Chhattisgarh based on The Hindu, Indian Express, PIB, Yojana, People, Events, Ideas and Issues across the Social, Economic & Political climate of the Chhattisgarh State. CGPSC Chhattisgarh Yearbook 2020

Why should you buy this Book?

Latest and Authentic information must for All Competitive Exams – The Mega Current Affairs Yearbook 2020 provides the latest information & most authentic data reference material on current Affairs and General Knowledge. It has specially been designed to cater to aspirants of various competitive exams like Civil services, CGPSC and Other Chhattisgarh PSC exams across the State. CGPSC Chhattisgarh Yearbook 2020

Student-Friendly Presentation – The material has been given in bulleted points wherever necessary to make the content easy to grasp. The book has ample tabular charts, mind Maps, Graphic Illustrations which further makes the learning process flexible and interesting. CGPSC Chhattisgarh Yearbook 2020

Must Have for Multiple Reasons: The Current Affairs Mega Yearbook 2020 is a Must-Have book for all kinds of Objective & Descriptive Tests, Essay Writing and Group Discussions & Personal Interviews, The Chhattisgarh General Knowledge section provides crisp and to-the-point information in Geography, History, Polity, Economy, General Science, etc. which otherwise could be very exhaustive. CGPSC Chhattisgarh Yearbook 2020

Wish you happy reading and best wishes for the examinations.

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CGPSC Chhattisgarh Yearbook 2020

Introduction of Chhattisgarh

Chhattisgarh is one of the 28 states of India, located in the centre-east of the country. It is the ninth-largest state in India, with an area of 135,192 km2. With a 2011 population of 25.5 million, Chhattisgarh is the 16th-most populated state in the country. A resource-rich state, it is a source of electricity and steel for the country, accounting for 15% of the total steel produced as well as large contributor of coal. Chhattisgarh is one of the fastest-developing states in India. CGPSC Chhattisgarh Yearbook 2020

The state was formed on 1 November 2000 by partitioning ten Chhattisgarhi and six Gondi speaking southeastern districts of Madhya Pradesh. The capital city is Raipur. Chhattisgarh borders the states of Madhya Pradesh in the northwest, Uttar Pradesh in the north, Jharkhand in northeast, Maharashtra in the southwest, Telangana and Andhra Pradesh in the south, and Odisha in the southeast. Currently the state comprises 28 districts. CGPSC Chhattisgarh Yearbook 2020

There are several opinions as to the origin of the name Chhattisgarh, which in ancient times was known as Dakshina Kosala (South Kosala), the native place of Bhagwan Rama as his mother name was Kaushalya, daughter of Kaushal Naresh.”Chhattisgarh” was popularised later during the time of the Maratha Empire and was first used in an official document in 1795. CGPSC Chhattisgarh Yearbook 2020

It is claimed that Chhattisgarh takes its name from the 36 ancient forts in the area. The old state had 36 demesnes (feudal territories): Ratanpur, Vijaypur, Kharound, Maro, Kautgarh, Nawagarh, Sondhi, Aukhar, Padarbhatta, Semriya, Champa, Lafa, Chhuri, Kenda, Matin, Aparora, Pendra, Kurkuti-kandri, Raipur, Patan, Simaga, Singarpur, Lavan, Omera, Durg, Saradha, Sirasa, Menhadi, Khallari, Sirpur, Figeswar, Rajim, Singhangarh, Suvarmar, Tenganagarh and Akaltara. However, experts do not agree with this explanation, as 36 forts cannot be archaeologically identified in this region. CGPSC Chhattisgarh Yearbook 2020

Another view, more popular with experts and historians, is that Chhattisgarh is the corrupted form of Chedisgarh meaning Raj or “Empire of the Chedis“. In ancient times, Chhattisgarh region had been part of the Chedi dynasty of Kalinga, in modern Odisha. In the medieval period up to 1803, a major portion of present eastern Chhattisgarh was part of the Sambalpur Kingdom of Odisha. CGPSC Chhattisgarh Yearbook 2020

The northern and southern parts of the state are hilly, while the central part is a fertile plain. The highest point in the state is the Gaurlata. Deciduous forests of the Eastern Highlands Forests cover roughly 44% of the state. The state animal is the van bhainsa, or wild Asian buffalo. The state bird is the pahari myna, or hill myna. The state tree is the Sal (Sarai) found in Bastar division. Sal- The State Tree of Chhattisgarh; CGPSC Chhattisgarh Yearbook 2020

In the north lies the edge of the great Indo-Gangetic plain. The Rihand River, a tributary of the Ganges, drains this area. The eastern end of the Satpura Range and the western edge of the Chota Nagpur Plateau form an east-west belt of hills that divide the Mahanadi River basin from the Indo-Gangetic plain. The outline of Chhattisgarh is like a sea horse. CGPSC Chhattisgarh Yearbook 2020

The central part of the state lies in the fertile upper basin of the Mahanadi River and its tributaries. This area has extensive rice cultivation. The upper Mahanadi basin is separated from the upper Narmada basin to the west by the Maikal Hills (part of the Satpuras) and from the plains of Odisha to the east by ranges of hills. The southern part of the state lies on the Deccan plateau, in the watershed of the Godavari River and its tributary, the Indravati River. The Mahanadi is the chief river of the state. The other main rivers are Hasdo (a tributary of Mahanadi), Rihand, Indravati, Jonk, Arpa and Shivnath. It is situated in the east of Madhya Pradesh. CGPSC Chhattisgarh Yearbook 2020

The natural environment of Koriya in Chhattisgarh includes forests, mountains, rivers and waterfalls.[citation needed] Koriya was a princely state during the British rule in India. Koriya is also known for its mineral deposits. Coal is also found in this part of the country. The dense forests are rich in wildlife. CGPSC Chhattisgarh Yearbook 2020

The Amrit Dhara Waterfall, Koriya’s main attraction, is a natural waterfall which originates from the Hasdeo River. The fall is situated seven kilometres from Koriya on the Manendragarh-Baikunthpur road. The Amrit Dhara Waterfall falls from a height of 27 m, and it is approximately 3–4.5 m wide. Chirimiri is one of the more popular places, known for its natural environment and climate, in Chhattisgarh. CGPSC Chhattisgarh Yearbook 2020

The climate of Chhattisgarh is tropical. It is hot and humid because of its proximity to the Tropic of Cancer and its dependence on the monsoons for rains. Summer temperatures in Chhattisgarh can reach upto 49 °C (113 °F). The monsoon season is from late June to October and is a welcome respite from the heat. Chhattisgarh receives an average of 1,292 millimetres (50.9 in) of rain. Winter is from November to January. Winters are pleasant with low temperatures and less humidity. CGPSC Chhattisgarh Yearbook 2020

In ancient times, this region was known as Dakshina Kosala. This area also finds mention in Ramayana and Mahabharata. One of the earliest statues of Vishnu has been excavated from Shunga period site at Malhar. Between the sixth and twelfth centuries, Sharabhpurias, Panduvanshis (of Mekala and Dakshina Kosala), Somavanshi, Kalachuri and Nagavanshi rulers dominated this region. The Bastar region of Chhattisgarh was invaded by Rajendra Chola I and Kulottunga Chola I of the Chola dynasty in the 11th century. CGPSC Chhattisgarh Yearbook 2020

Name Area
Guru Ghasidas (Sanjay) National Park 1440.71 Km2
Indravati National Park 1258.37 Km2
Kanger Ghati National Park 200 Km2

Chhattisgarh has a heritage of robust culture. The state is the storehouse of Performing arts, Literature and crafts. The culture of Chhattisgarh includes various types of traditional Dances, Music, cuisines, traditional dress etc. which includes a lot in general knowledge of Chhattisgarh. CGPSC Chhattisgarh Yearbook 2020

S.No Description Summary
1. Folk Dance Panthi Rawat Nacha Pandwani Chaitra Kaksar Saila Khamb-swang Bhatra Naat Rabhas Raai Mao-Pata Sow
2. Music Pandavani
3. Major Festival Bastar Dussehra Bastar Lokotsav Madai Festival Bhoramdeo Festival Goncha Festival Teeja Festival Champaran Mela Narayanpur Mela Pola Hareli First fruit Festival
4. Cuisine (Famous Food) Aamat Bafauri Bhajia Chousela Dubkikadhi Farra Khurmi Moong Bara Thethari Muthia
5. Traditional Dress Men: Dhotis and Headgears Women: Lugda (Knee length and full length) Polkha (Blouse)

The present state of Chhattisgarh was carved out of Madhya Pradesh on 1 November 2000. The demand for a separate state was first raised in the 1920s. Similar demands kept cropping up at regular intervals; however, a well-organised movement was never launched. Several all-party platforms were formed and they usually resolved around petitions, public meetings, seminars, rallies and strikes. A demand for separate Chhattisgarh was raised in 1924 by the Raipur Congress unit and also discussed in the Annual Session of the Indian Congress at Tripuri. A discussion also took place of forming a Regional Congress organisation for Chhattisgarh. When the State Reorganisation Commission was set up in 1954, the demand for a separate Chhattisgarh was put forward but was not accepted. In 1955, a demand for a separate state was raised in the Nagpur assembly of the then state of Madhya Bharat. CGPSC Chhattisgarh Yearbook 2020

The 1990s saw more activity for a demand for the new state, such as the formation of a statewide political forum, especially the Chhattisgarh Rajya Nirman Manch. Chandu lal Chadrakar led this forum, several successful region-wide strikes and rallies were organised under the banner of the forum, all of which were supported by major political parties, including the Indian National Congress and the Bharatiya Janata Party. CGPSC Chhattisgarh Yearbook 2020

The new National Democratic Alliance (NDA) government sent the redrafted Separate Chhattisgarh Bill for the approval of the Madhya Pradesh Assembly, where it was once again unanimously approved and then it was tabled in the Lok Sabha. This bill for a separate Chhattisgarh was passed in the Lok Sabha and the Rajya Sabha, paving the way for the creation of a separate state of Chhattisgarh. The President of India gave his consent to the Madhya Pradesh Reorganisation Act 2000 on 25 August 2000. The government of India subsequently set 1 November 2000, as the day the state of Madhya Pradesh would be divided into Chhattisgarh and Madhya Pradesh. CGPSC Chhattisgarh Yearbook 2020

Divisions of Chhattisgarh

Bastar Durg Raipur Bilaspur Surguja
Bastar (Jagdalpur) Bijapur Sukma Dantewada (Dakshin Bastar) Kondagaon Narayanpur Kanker (Uttar Bastar) Kawardha (Kabir dham) Rajnandgaon Balod Durg Bemetara Dhamtari Gariyaband Raipur Baloda Bazar Mahasamund Bilaspur Mungeli Korba Janjgir-Champa Raigarh Gaurela-Pendra-Marwahi w.e.f. 10th February, 2020 Koriya Surajpur Surguja (Ambikapur) Balrampur-Ramanujganj Jashpur

Chhattisgarh is rich in minerals. It produces 20% of the country’s total cement production. It has the highest output of coal in the country with second-highest reserves. It is third in iron ore production and first in tin production. Limestone, dolomite and bauxite are abundant. It is the only tin ore-producing state in India. Other commercially extracted minerals include corundum, garnet, quartz, marble, alexandrite and diamonds. CGPSC Chhattisgarh Yearbook 2020

The state hosts many religious sects such as Satnami Panth, Kabirpanth, Ramnami Samaj and others. Champaran (Chhattisgarh) is a small town with religious significance as the birthplace of the Saint Vallabhacharya, increasingly important as a pilgrimage site for the Gujarati community. CGPSC Chhattisgarh Yearbook 2020

Chhattisgarh has a significant role in the life of the Lord Rama. Lord Rama along with his wife Sita and his younger brother Lakshaman had started his Vanvas in the Bastar region (more precisely Dandakaranya region) of Chhattisgarh. They lived more than 10 of their 14 years of Vanvas in different places of Chhattisgarh. One of the remarkable places is Shivrinarayan which is nearby Bilaspur district of Chhattisgarh. Shivrinarayan was named after an old lady Shabari. When Ram visited Shabari she said “I do not have anything to offer other than my heart, but here are some berry fruits. May it please you, my Lord.” Saying so, Shabari offered the fruits she had meticulously collected to Rama. When Rama was tasting them, Lakshmana raised the concern that Shabari had already tasted them and therefore unworthy of eating. To this Rama said that of the many types of food he had tasted, “nothing could equal these berry fruits, offered with such devotion. You taste them, and then alone will you know. Whosoever offers a fruit, leaf, flower or some water with love, I partake it with great joy.” CGPSC Chhattisgarh Yearbook 2020

The Odia culture is prominent in the eastern parts of Chhattisgarh bordering Odisha. Chhattisgarh is a storehouse of literature, performing arts and crafts—all of which derives its substance and sustenance from the day-to-day life experiences of its people. Religion, mythology, social and political events, nature and folklore are favourite motifs. Traditional crafts include painting, woodcarving, bell metal craft, bamboo ware, and tribal jewellery. Chhattisgarh has a rich literary heritage with roots that lie deep in the sociological and historical movements of the region. Its literature reflects the regional consciousness and the evolution of an identity distinct from others in Central India. CGPSC Chhattisgarh Yearbook 2020

Panthi, Raut Nacha, Pandwani, Chaitra, Kaksar, Saila, Khamb-swang, Bhatra Naat, Rabhas, Raai, Mao-Pata and Sow are the several indigenous dance styles of Chhattisgarh. Panthi, the folk dance of the Satnami community, has religious overtones. Panthi is performed on Maghi Purnima, tabla the anniversary of the birth of Guru Ghasidas. The dancers dance around a jaitkhamb set up for the occasion, to songs eulogising their spiritual head. The songs reflect a view of nirvana, conveying the spirit of their guru’s renunciation and the teachings of saint poets like Kabir, Ramdas and Dadu. Dancers with bent torsos and swinging arms dance, carried away by their devotion, As the rhythm quickens, they perform acrobatics and form human pyramids. CGPSC Chhattisgarh Yearbook 2020

Chhattisgarh is a storehouse of literature, performing arts and crafts—all of which derives its substance and sustenance from the day-to-day life experiences of its people. Religion, mythology, social and political events, nature and folklore are favourite motifs. Traditional crafts include painting, woodcarving, bell metal craft, bamboo ware, and tribal jewellery. Chhattisgarh has a rich literary heritage with roots that lie deep in the sociological and historical movements of the region. Its literature reflects the regional consciousness and the evolution of an identity distinct from others in Central India. CGPSC Chhattisgarh Yearbook 2020

S.No Description Answer
1. Founded on 1 November 2000
2. Capital Formation 1 November 2000, Raipur
3. Largest city Raipur
4. Also Known as Rice bowl of India
  5. Ruled By Sharabhpurias Kalachuri Nagavanshi Maratha rule (Bhonsales of Nagpur)
        6.        Major Historical Events 10th century- The region was ruled by Rajput family Haihaya dynasty. 1741- Marathas attacked in Chhattisgarh and destroyed the Haihaya power 1818- Chhattisgarh came under British control for the first time 1-11-2000 – Chhattisgarh became a separate state

 Chhattisgarh is the 10th largest state in India. Chhattisgarh covers an area of 1, 35,192 square kilometres with a total population over 2.55 Crores. The average temperature of Chhattisgarh is 40°C in summers and 25°C in winters. CGPSC Chhattisgarh Yearbook 2020

S.No Description Summary
1. Total Area 135,192 km²
2. Population 2.55 crores
3. The rank of the state Area Rank:-10th Population Rank:- 17th
4. Population Density 190/km2 (490/sq mi)
5. State Bounded By Uttar Pradesh and Jharkhand  (North) Odisha (East) Andhra Pradesh (South) Maharastra and Madhya Pradesh (West)
6. Soil Red–Yellow Soil Red Sandy Loam soil Black soil Laterite Soil
7. Minerals Bauxite Dolomite Iron Ore Limestone Garnet Tin
8. Major Crops Grain Wheat Corn Peanut Legume Hazelnut
9. Forest Area 59,772 km²
10. Climate Tropical Monsoon Climate
11. Rivers Arpa Jonk Godavari Gopad Kanhar Savari Sankh Shivnath Mahanadi
12. Major Dam Name: Minimata (Hasdeo) Bango
River: Hasdeo
13. Major Flora Bamboo Coconut Mangoes Cashew Jackfruit Pineapples Blackberries
14. Major Fauna Blue bull Wild boar Chinkara Blackbuck Sambhar Barking Deer Wild dog Wild boar Jackals hyena Crocodiles Tigers
City Name
Korba Power hub of India
Jagdalpur The tourism capital of Chhattisgarh
Bhilai Steel City of India
Kanker Gateway of Bastar
S.No. Name of Wildlife Sanctuary Year of Notification Total Area(km²)
1. Achanakmar  Wildlife Sanctuary 1975 551.55
2. Badalkhol  Wildlife Sanctuary 1975 104.45
3. Barnawapara  Wildlife Sanctuary 1976 244.66
4. Bhairamgarh  Wildlife Sanctuary 1983 138.95
5. Bhoramdev  Wildlife Sanctuary 2001 163.8
6. Sarangarh-Gomardha  Wildlife Sanctuary 1975 277.82
7. Pamed Wild Buffalo  Wildlife Sanctuary 1985 262.12
8. Semarsot  Wildlife Sanctuary 1978 430.36
9. Sitanadi  Wildlife Sanctuary 1974 553.36
10. Tamor Pingla  Wildlife Sanctuary 1978 608.53
11. Udanti Wild Buffalo  Wildlife Sanctuary 1985 247.59

Geographical features

Coordinates: 21.27°N 81.60°E

Established: 01 November 2000

Capital: Raipur

Largest city: Raipur

Districts: 27 (9 dist. new)

Official languages: Chhattisgarhi and Hindi

Major Rivers of Chhattisgarh:

Name of the river:  Kanhar River

Passes through: Uttar Pradesh, Jharkhand, Chhattisgarh

Name of the river: Rihand River

Passes through: Uttar Pradesh, Chhattisgarh 

Name of the river: Sankh River

Passes through:  Chattisgarh, Odisha, Jharkhand

Name of the river: Tandula River

Passes through: Chhattisgarh

Name of the river: Sondur River

Passes through: Chhattisgarh

Name of the river: Shivnath River

Passes through: Chhattisgarh

Name of the river: Sabari River

Passes through: Andhra Pradesh, Odisha, Chhattisgarh

Name of the river: Rihand River

Passes through: Chhattisgarh

Name of the river: Mand River

Passes through: Chhattisgarh, Orissa

Name of the river: Indravati River

Passes through: Maharashtra, Chhattisgarh, Andhra Pradesh

Major Waterfalls

Name of the waterfall: Chitrakoot Falls

Location: Jagdalpur, India

Total height: 29 metres

 Watercourse: Indravati River

Name of the waterfall: Tirthgarh Falls

Total height: 91 metres

Watercourse: Kanger River

The history of Chhattisgarh, which was called as South Kosala goes back to the 4th century AD. The mythological history of the state can be traced back to the days of Mahabharata and the Ramayana. The Haihaya dynasty ruled Chhattisgarh for six centuries during the 14th century. During the middle ages, Chalukya dynasty established its rule in Bastar. Annmdev was the first Chalukya ruler, who founded the dynasty in Bastar in 1320. CGPSC Chhattisgarh Yearbook 2020

In 1741, the kingdom was seized by the Marathas from the Haihaya dynasty. After conquering the kingdom during 1745 AD, Raghunathsinghji, the last descendant of the Ratanpur house was forced to leave the area. So finally in the year 1758, Chhattisgarh was conquered by Marathas and Bimbaji Bhonsle was appointed as the ruler. After the demise of Bimbaji Bhonsle, suba system was followed by the Marathas. It was an era of unrest and misrule. Maratha army was involved in large-scale loot and ransack. The Maratha officials compromised the interests of the region to the British. The atrocities of the Maratha rule were opposed by the Gonds. The kingdom was attacked by the Pindaris during the early Nineteenth Century. CGPSC Chhattisgarh Yearbook 2020

In the year 1818, Chhattisgarh came under the British rule. After Nagpur was included under the rule of the British government in 1854, Chhattisgarh was created into a deputy commissionership. Its headquarters were located at Raipur. The British government brought about certain reforms in the administrative and revenue systems. CGPSC Chhattisgarh Yearbook 2020

The tribals of Bastar strongly stood firmly against the British, which resulted in the Halba rebellion, which continued for about five years from 1774-1779. Vir Narain Singh’s name is written in golden words in the history of Chhattisgarh, as he was the first martyr from this region in the struggle of independence. CGPSC Chhattisgarh Yearbook 2020

Chhattisgarh is one of the states of India located in the central part of the country. The state is surrounded by Jharkhand state on northwest, Orissa on the east, Andhra Pradesh on the south, and Maharastra on the southwest. It has been formed from the state of Madhya Pradesh. The origin of the name of Chhattisgarh has an interesting and long story.

During the ancient period Chhattisgarh was called Dakshin Kosala. We can get an evidence of it in the inscriptions and literary works of the early writers. During the Mughal reign the region was called Ratanpur territory and not Chhattisgarh. The word Chhattisgarh gained popularity during the rule of the Marathas. It was used for the first time in 1795, in an official document……………………………

BPSC Bihar Yearbook 2020 : Latest And Current Affairs

It gives us immense pleasure in presenting the Bihar Current Affairs Yearbook 2020, Useful for BPSC State PSC and all other competitive exams. This book deals with the relevant features and topics of Current affairs of State in a systematic and comprehensive manner by the use of simple and concise language for easy and quick understanding. We hope that the readers will find this book user friendly and helpful in preparation of their examinations. I look forwarded to have the views, comment, suggestions and criticism from readers which would definitely help in further improvement of the Book. I would like to heartfelt thanks to all my team members for their efforts to prepare this book. BPSC Bihar Yearbook 2020

UPSC IAS Prelims 2020 Online 60 Days Programme

Current Affairs consists of latest news/ information about Bihar based on The Hindu, Indian Express, PIB, Yojana, People, Events, Ideas and Issues across the Social, Economic & Political climate of the State.

Bihar Current Affairs/General Knowledge Yearbook 2020 has become an integral part of a lot of entrance exams being conducted at the graduate and under-graduate levels. It is very important for students to remain updated on the current happenings in their surroundings especially those that are important from the perspective of state. Current Affairs Yearbook 2020, a thoroughly revised, reorganised, updated and ENLARGED edition, presents a comprehensive study of all the sections that are covered under the subject of General Knowledge. The Yearbook 2020 provides the latest information & most authentic data reference material on Current Affairs and General Knowledge. It has specially been designed to cater to aspirants of various competitive exams like BPSC and Other Bihar State PSC Civil services Exams across the State. The material has been written in a lucid language and prepared as per the requirements of the various competitive exams. BPSC Bihar Yearbook 2020

Why should you buy this Book?

Latest and Authentic information must for All Competitive Exams – The Mega Current Affairs Yearbook 2020 provides the latest information & most authentic data reference material on current Affairs and General Knowledge. It has specially been designed to cater to aspirants of various competitive exams like Civil services, BPSC and Other Bihar PSC exams across the State. BPSC Bihar Yearbook 2020

Student-Friendly Presentation – The material has been given in bulleted points wherever necessary to make the content easy to grasp. The book has ample tabular charts, mind Maps, Graphic Illustrations which further makes the learning process flexible and interesting. BPSC Bihar Yearbook 2020

Must Have for Multiple Reasons: The Current Affairs Mega Yearbook 2020 is a Must-Have book for all kinds of Objective & Descriptive Tests, Essay Writing and Group Discussions & Personal Interviews, The Bihar General Knowledge section provides crisp and to-the-point information in Geography, History, Polity, Economy, General Science, etc. which otherwise could be very exhaustive. BPSC Bihar Yearbook 2020

This Ebook have: 1. Introduction of Bihar 2. Current Affairs whole year 3. Practice MCQ

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BPSC Bihar Current Affairs Yearbook 2020

Introduction of Bihar

Bihar is a state in eastern India. It is the twelfth-largest Indian state, with an area of 94,163 km2. The third-largest state by population, it is contiguous with Uttar Pradesh to its west, Nepal to the north, the northern part of West Bengal to the east, and with Jharkhand to the south. The Bihar plain is split by the river Ganges, which flows from west to east. Three main regions converge in the state: Magadh, Mithila, and Bhojpur. BPSC Bihar Yearbook 2020

On 15 November 2000, southern Bihar was ceded to form the new state of Jharkhand. Only 11.3% of the population of Bihar lives in urban areas, which is the lowest in India after Himachal Pradesh. Additionally, almost 58% of Biharis are below the age of 25, giving Bihar the highest proportion of young people of any Indian state.

In ancient and classical India, the area that is now Bihar was considered a centre of power, learning, and culture. From Magadha arose India’s first empire, the Maurya Empire, as well as one of the world’s most widely adhered-to religions: Buddhism. Magadha empires, notably under the Maurya and Gupta dynasties, unified large parts of South Asia under a central rule. Another region of Bihar is Mithila which was an early centre of learning and the centre of the Videha kingdom. BPSC Bihar Yearbook 2020

Since the late 1970s, Bihar has lagged far behind other Indian states in terms of social and economic development. Many economists and social scientists claim that this is a direct result of the policies of the central government, such as the freight equalization policy, its apathy towards Bihar, lack of Bihari sub-nationalism, and the Permanent Settlement of 1793 by the British East India Company. The state government has, however, made significant strides in developing the state. Improved governance has led to an economic revival in the state through increased investment in infrastructure, better health care facilities, greater emphasis on education, and a reduction in crime and corruption. BPSC Bihar Yearbook 2020

The name Bihar is derived from the Sanskrit and Pali word, meaning “abode”. The region roughly encompassing the present state was dotted with Buddhist viharas, the abodes of Buddhist monks in the ancient and medieval periods. Medieval writer Minhaj al-Siraj Juzjani records in the Tabaqat-i Nasiri that in 1198 Bakhtiyar Khalji committed a massacre in a town identified with the word, later known as Bihar Sharif, about 70 km away from Bodh Gaya.

Chirand, on the northern bank of the Ganga River, in Saran district, has an archaeological record from the Neolithic age (about 2500–1345 BC). Regions of Bihar—such as Magadha, Mithila and Anga—are mentioned in religious texts and epics of ancient India.

Mithila gained prominence after the establishment of the Videha Kingdom in ancient India. During the late Vedic period (c. 1100-500 BCE), Videha became one of the major political and cultural centers of South Asia, along with Kuru and Pancalas. The kings of the Videha Kingdom were called Janakas. Sita, a daughter of one of the Janaks of Mithila is mentioned as the consort of Lord Rama, in the Hindu epic, Ramayana, written by Valmiki. The Videha Kingdom later became incorporated into the Vajji confederacy which had its capital in the city of Vaishali, which is also in Mithila. Vajji had a republican form of government where the king was elected from the number of rajas. Based on the information found in texts pertaining to Jainism and Buddhism, Vajji was established as a republic by the 6th century BCE, before the birth of Gautama Buddha in 563 BCE, making it the first known republic in India.

The Haryanka dynasty, founded in 684 BC, ruled Magadha from the city of Rajgriha (modern Rajgir), the two well-known kings from this dynasty were Bimbisara and his son Ajatashatru, who imprisoned his father to ascend the throne. Ajatashatru founded the city of Pataliputra which later became the capital of Magadha. He declared war and conquered the Vajji. The Haryanka dynasty was followed by the Shishunaga dynasty. Later the Nanda Dynasty ruled a vast tract stretching from Bengal to Punjab. BPSC Bihar Yearbook 2020

The Nanda dynasty was replaced by the Maurya Empire, India’s first empire. The Maurya Empire and the religion of Buddhism arose in the region that now makes up modern Bihar. The Mauryan Empire, which originated from Magadha in 325 BC, was founded by Chandragupta Maurya, who was born in Magadha. It had its capital at Pataliputra (modern Patna). The Mauryan emperor, Ashoka, who was born in Pataliputra (Patna), is believed to be one of the greatest rulers in the history of the world. BPSC Bihar Yearbook 2020

The Gupta Empire, which originated in Magadha in 240 AD, is referred as the Golden Age of India in science, mathematics, astronomy, commerce, religion, and Indian philosophy. Bihar and Bengal was invaded by Rajendra Chola I of the Chola dynasty in the 11th century.

This dynasty signifies the establishment of second empire in ancient Indian History. Gupta succeeded in bringing major parts of India under a unified administration to a great extent. The difference between Gupta empire’s and Mauryan empire’s administration was that in the Mauryan administration and power was centralised but the in the Gupta administration, power was more decentralised. Inscriptions state that the Sri Gupta was the first king. BPSC Bihar Yearbook 2020

The Gupta Empire is referred to as the Golden Age of India because of the extensive inventions and discoveries in science, technology, engineering, art, dialectic, literature, logic, mathematics, astronomy, religion and philosophy that illuminated the elements of Hindu Culture.

The Gupta Empire came into power in around 275 AD. It marked the end of 500 hundred years of domination of the provincial powers and resulting disquiet that began with the fall of the Mauryas. BPSC Bihar Yearbook 2020

Buddhism in Magadha went into decline due to the invasion of Muhammad bin Bakhtiyar Khalji, during which many of the viharas and the famed universities of Nalanda and Vikramashila were destroyed. It was claimed that thousands of Buddhist monks were massacred during the 12th century. D. N. Jha suggests, instead, that these incidents were the result of Buddhist-Brahmin skirmishes in a fight for supremacy. After the fall of the Pala Empire, the Chero dynasty ruled some parts of Bihar from the 12th century to the 16th century until Mughal rule. In 1540, the great Pathan chieftain, Sher Shah Suri, from Sasaram, took northern India from the Mughals, defeating the Mughal army of Emperor Humayun. Sher Shah declared Delhi his capital.

From the 11th century to the 20th century, Mithila was ruled by various indigenous dynasties. The first of these were the Karnatas, followed by the Oiniwar dynasty and finally Raj Darbhanga. It was during this period that the capital of Mithila was shifted to Darbhanga.

The tenth and the last Guru of Sikhism, Guru Gobind Singh was born in Patna. After the Battle of Buxar (1764), the British East India Company obtained the Diwani rights (rights to administer, and collect revenue or tax) for Bihar, Bengal and Odisha. The rich resources of fertile land, water and skilled labour had attracted the foreign imperialists, particularly the Dutch and British, in the 18th century. A number of agriculture-based industries had been started in Bihar by foreign entrepreneurs. Bihar remained a part of the Bengal Presidency of British India until 1912, when the province of Bihar and Orissa was carved out as a separate province. Since 2010, Bihar has celebrated its birthday as Bihar Diwas on 22 March. BPSC Bihar Yearbook 2020

Farmers in Champaran had revolted against indigo cultivation in 1914 (at Pipra) and 1916 (Turkaulia). In April 1917, Mahatma Gandhi visited Champaran, where Raj Kumar Shukla had drawn his attention to the exploitation of the peasants by European indigo planters. The Champaran Satyagraha that followed received support from many Bihari nationalists, such as Rajendra Prasad and Anugraha Narayan Sinha.

In the northern and central regions of Bihar, the Kisan Sabha (peasant movement) was an important consequence of the independence movement. It began in 1929 under the leadership of Swami Sahajanand Saraswati who formed the Bihar Provincial Kisan Sabha (BPKS), to mobilise peasant grievances against the zamindari attacks on their occupancy rights. The movement intensified and spread from Bihar across the rest of India, culminating in the formation of the All India Kisan Sabha (AIKS) at the Lucknow session of the Indian National Congress in April 1936, where Saraswati was elected as its first president. BPSC Bihar Yearbook 2020

Bihari migrant workers have faced violence and prejudice in many parts of India, such as Maharashtra, Punjab and Assam after independence. Bihar has a diverse climate. Its temperature is subtropical in general, with hot summers and cold winters. Bihar is a vast stretch of fertile plain. It is drained by the Ganges River, including its northern tributaries Gandak and Koshi, originating in the Nepal Himalayas and the Bagmati originating in the Kathmandu Valley that regularly flood parts of the Bihar plains. The total area covered by the state of Bihar is 94,163 km2. the state is located between 24°-20′-10″ N ~ 27°-31′-15″ N latitude and between 83°-19′-50″ E ~ 88°-17′-40″ E longitude. Its average elevation above sea level is 173 feet.

The Ganges divides Bihar into two unequal halves and flows through the middle from west to east. Other Ganges tributaries are the Son, Budhi Gandak, Chandan, Orhani and Phalgu. Though the Himalayas begin at the foothills, a short distance inside Nepal and to the north of Bihar, the mountains influence Bihar’s landforms, climate, hydrology and culture. Central parts of Bihar have some small hills, for example, the Rajgir hills. To the south is the Chota Nagpur plateau, which was part of Bihar until 2000 but now is part of a separate state called Jharkhand. BPSC Bihar Yearbook 2020

Bihar is the fourth-largest producer of vegetables and the eighth-largest producer of fruits in India. Bihar has high agricultural production making it one of the strongest sectors of the state. About 80 percent of the state’s population is employed in agriculture, which is higher as compared to India’s average. The main agricultural products produced in Bihar are litchi, guava, mango, pineapple, brinjal, lady’s finger, cauliflower, cabbage, rice, wheat and sugarcane, and sunflower. Though good soil and favourable climatic conditions such as good rainfall favour agriculture, it has to encounter flood threat as well, which may drain off the fertile soil, if not conserved properly. The state (mostly southern parts) faces droughts almost every year affecting production of crops such as paddy.

There are several traditional styles of painting practiced in Bihar. One is Mithila painting, a style of Indian painting used in the Mithila region of Bihar. Traditionally, the painting was one of the skills that were passed down from generation to generation in the families of the Mithila region, mainly by women. Painting was usually done on walls during festivals, religious events, and other milestones of the life cycle, like birth, Upanayanam (the sacred thread ceremony), and marriage.

Mithila painting is also called Madhubani art. It mostly depicts human beings and their association with nature. Common scenes illustrate deities like Krishna, Ram, Shiva, Durga, Lakshmi, and Saraswati from ancient epics. Natural objects like the sun, moon, and religious plants like Tulsi are also widely painted, along with scenes from the royal court and social events like weddings. Generally, no space is left empty. BPSC Bihar Yearbook 2020

Bihar has produced musicians like Bharat Ratna Ustad Bismillah Khan and dhrupad singers like the Malliks (Darbhanga Gharana) and the Mishras (Bettiah Gharana) along with poets like Vidyapati Thakur who contributed to Maithili Music. The classical music in Bihar is a form of the Hindustani classical music. Gaya is another centre of excellence in classical music, particularly of the Tappa and Thumri varieties. Pandit Govardhan Mishra – son of the Ram Prasad Mishra, himself an accomplished singer – is perhaps the finest living exponent of Tappa singing in India today, according to Padma Shri Gajendra Narayan Singh, founding secretary of the Sangeet Natak Akademi of Bihar. Gajendra Narayan Singh also writes, in his memoir, that Champa nagar, Banaili, was another major centre of classical music. Rajkumar Shyamanand Sinha of Champa nagar, Banaili princely state, was a great patron of music and was himself one of the finest exponents of classical vocal music in Bihar in his time.

Hindu Goddess Sita, the consort of Lord Rama is believed to be born in Sitamarhi district in the Mithila region of modern-day Bihar. Gautama Buddha attained Enlightenment at Bodh Gaya, a town located in the modern day district of Gaya in Bihar. Vasupujya, the 12th Jain Tirthankara was born in Champapuri, Bhagalpur. Vardhamana Mahavira, the 24th and the last Tirthankara of Jainism, was born in Vaishali around the 6th century BC. BPSC Bihar Yearbook 2020

Mahipala I recouped northern and eastern Bengal inside of three years of ascended the throne in 988 AD. He additionally recouped the Northern part of the present-day Burdwan division. Amid his rule, Rajendra Chola I of the Chola Empire much of the time attacked Bengal from 1021 to 1023 AD with a specific end goal to get Ganges water and simultaneously, succeeded to humble the rulers, obtaining significant goods. The rulers of Bengal who were defeated by Rajendra Chola were Dharmapala, Ranasur and Govinda chandra, who may have been feudatories under Mahipala I of the Pala Dynasty. Rajendra Chola I defeated Mahipala. Mahipala additionally picked up control of north and south Bihar, presumably supported by the intrusions of Mahmud of Ghazni, which depleted the quality of different rulers of North India. He may have likewise vanquished Varanasi and encompassing zone, as his siblings Sthirapala and Vasantapala embraced development and repairs of a few hallowed structures at Varanasi. Later, the Kalachuri king Gangeyadeva added Varanasi subsequent to defeating the ruler of Anga, which could have been Mahipala I.

In the wake of picking up control of Varendra, Rampala attempted to resuscitate the Pala realm with restricted achievement. He ruled from another capital at Ramavati, which remained the Pala capital until the administration’s end. He diminished assessment, advanced development and built open utilities. He brought Kamarupa and Rar under his control, and constrained the Varman lord of east Bengal to acknowledge his suzerainty. He likewise battled with the Ganga ruler for control of present-day Orissa; the Gangas figured out how to add the area strictly when his passing. Rampala kept up inviting relations with the Chola lord Kulottunga to secure backing against the common enemies: the Ganas and the Chalukyas. He held the Senas under wraps, however lost Mithila to a Karnataka boss named Nanyuadeva. He likewise kept down the forceful outline of the Gahadavala ruler Govindacharndra through a wedding organization together.

Rampala was the last powerful Pala ruler. After his death, defiance broke out in Assam amid his son Kumarapala’s rule. The rebellion was squashed by Vaidya deva, yet after Kumarapala’s death, Vaidya deva for all intents and purposes made a different kingdom.

Mohammad Bin Bakhtiyar Khilji was one of the Military Generals of Qutb-ud-din Aibak invaded some parts of eastern India at the end of the 12th Century and at the beginning of the 13th century. During his invasion many of the Viharas and universities were sacked and thousands of Buddhist monks were massacred.

The first half of the 16th century AD witnessed the Afghan- Mughal contest for power in the Sub-continent. After defeating Humayun, Sher Shah Suri emerged as a powerful Pashtun Afghan ruler and established the Sur Empire. The Empire’s strength lay in the great administrative capacity and reforms of the ruler, aimed at the benefit of people. The Empire boasts of extremely well thought of governmental systems and policies as well as great architectural marvels. BPSC Bihar Yearbook 2020

After Ibrahim Lodi was defeated by Babur in 1526 AD (first battle of Panipat), the Afghan chiefs who were still powerful, gathered together under the leadership of Sher Shah Suri to mark their discontent against the alien rule, As a result the Sur Empire of Pashtun origin (the tribal house of Sur) came to power and ruled a massive territory of Northern  part  of  South  Asia  from  1540-1556  AD,  with  their  capital  as  Delhi.  The empire’s major strength is in the fact that it disturbed the hold of the Mughal Empire under Humayun.

The Sur Dynasty controlled the major territories of Mughals east to west, from current day’s eastern Afghanistan to Bangladesh. Establishing a strong hold over the throne for nearly 17 years, the Sur Empire also systematized administrative reforms, promoted economic growth and created a trustworthy relationship with the public. However, when their rule ended with the reinstitution of the Mughal Empire, the Surs belonged to the sub-Groups of Ghilzais. BPSC Bihar Yearbook 2020

Military Achievements of Sher Shah Suri

  • Encounter on the fort of Chunar and Sher Shah’s diplomatic surrender.
  • Battle of Chausa with Humayun and Sher Shah’s victory.
  • Batttle of Kannauj and Sher Shah’s decisive victory over Humayun. With the victory at Kannauj, Sher Shah became the ruler of Delhi. Agra, Sambhal and Gwalior etc., also came under his sway. This victory ended the rule of the Mughal dynasty for 15 years.
  • Battle at Surajgarh (1533 AD): He defeated the combined forces of the Lohani chiefs of Bihar and Mohamud Shah of Bengal at Surajgarh. With this victory, whole of Bihar came under Sher Shah.
  • Invasion of Bengal: He plundered Bengal several times and by capturing Gaur, the capital of Bengal, forced Mohammad Shah to seek refugee with Humayun.
  • Conquest of Punjab (1540-42 AD): He immediately conquered Punjab from Kamran (Brother of Humayun) after his accession to the throne.
  • Suppression of Khokhars (1542 AD): He suppressed the turbulent Khokhars of the northern region of river Indus and Jhelum.
  • Conquest of Malwa (1542 AD): The ruler of Malwa had not helped Sher Shah in his struggle with Humayun. Therefore he attacked Malwa and annexed it to his empire.
  • Conquest of Raisin: He attacked Raisin – a Rajput principality and besieged it. Rajput ruler Purnamal entered into an agreement with Sher Shah that if he surrendered, his family would not be harmed. However Sher Shah did not honour this agreement.
  • Conquest of Multan and Sind (1543 AD): Sher Shah conquered and annexed these provinces into his empire.
  • Conquest of Marwar (1543-1545 AD): He brought Marwar under his control by forged letters and sowing dissensions in the army of Maldev, the ruler of Mewar.
  • Conquest of Kalanjar (1545 AD) and death of Sher Shah: He launched a fierce attack. He won but lost his life when he was grievously injured by the blast.

Bihar is situated on the one of the fertile regions of the world which is drained by river Ganga. It was famous for its cotton, textile, and saltpetre and indigo. Hence, it was one of the important trading centres of India from Ancient to Medieval India. This makes reason of enticing for European to open trade factories and centre for trade. BPSC Bihar Yearbook 2020

Sher Shah Suri is also referred as Sher Khan or the Lion King administrator of medieval India. His administration included a blend of old institutions and new spirit to serve the interest of the people…………………..

Current Affairs Half Yearly July-December for Civil Services Examination 2020

Current Affairs Half Yearly Study Notes for UPSC IAS & State PSC Preliminary Examination 2020. We have covered current affairs from July – December 2019 for competitive exams only.

Topic Covered: Current Affairs trending topics in detail from the following subjects.

1. Geography of India and World

2. History of India and World

3. Polity and Governance

4. Science and Technology

5. Economy of India

6. Art and Culture

7. Environment and Ecology

This is must read book for Civil Services Preliminary Exam – 2020

Click Here To Download

Content

  1. Article 142, Invoked by Supreme Court
  2. Contributions of Homi J. Bhabha
  3. Cyclone Bulbul
  4. Climate change is already damaging health of children, says Lancet report
  5. Global Population Summit in Nairobi
  6. Emperor Penguins would be extinct if climate goals are not met
  7. How successful is cloud seeding technology?
  8. Merging Assam Rifles with ITBP
  9. Kalapani, a small area on the India map that bothers Nepal
  10. Suranga Bawadi on World Monument Watch list
  11. Wifi Access Network Interface (WANI)
  12. OECD tax proposal (BEPS 2.0)
  13. Falling Index of Industrial Production
  14. National grid of ports
  15. Code of Conduct for MPs and MLAs
  16. National Register of Citizens (NRC)
  17. EPFO to restore commutation of pension
  18. Oxytocin Ban
  19. SEBI’s norms for FPIs
  20. Sabka Vishwas Scheme
  21. Money Laundering in India
  22. Press Council of India
  23. WorldSkills Kazan
  24. ‘Angikaar campaign’
  25. child well-being index
  26. Desertification
  27. 18 endangered sharks and rays afforded protection
  28. Gravitational Lensing
  29. Great Barrier Reef
  30. Open Acreage Licensing Policy (OALP)
  31. RBI annual report
  32. Food fortification
  33. Security cover of VIPs
  34. Water management practices dismal in states: Niti Aayog
  35. WorldSkills Kazan
  36. Government releases Rs 47,436 crore funds for afforestation
  37. Antibiotic resistance
  38. 14th Conference of Parties (COP14) to the UN Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) and report on Soil Organic Carbon (SOC)
  39. Appointment of the Supreme Court judges
  40. Eastern Economic Forum
  41. Code of Conduct for MPs and MLAs
  42. National Register of Citizens (NRC)
  43. EPFO to restore commutation of pension
  44. Oxytocin Ban
  45. SEBI’s norms for FPIs
  46. Sabka Vishwas Scheme
  47. Money Laundering in India
  48. Press Council of India
  49. WorldSkills Kazan
  50. ‘Angikaar campaign’
  51. child well-being index
  52. Desertification
  53. 18 endangered sharks and rays afforded protection
  54. Gravitational Lensing
  55. Great Barrier Reef
  56. Open Acreage Licensing Policy (OALP)
  57. RBI annual report
  58. Food fortification
  59. Security cover of VIPs
  60. Water management practices dismal in states: Niti Aayog
  61. WorldSkills Kazan
  62. Government releases Rs 47,436 crore fund for afforestation
  63. Antibiotic resistance
  64. Five states to get new Governors
  65. Hurricane Dorian
  66. Project Miniature Sun
  67. Jurisdiction of High Court
  68. Artificial Intelligence Based Solutions to Combat TB
  69. Automatic Exchange of Information
  70. ‘Build for Digital India’ programme
  71. Ethanol blending
  72. Global Liveability Index 2019
  73. Dalits welfare
  74. Mudra loan
  75. Rising Electronics Exports as Bright Spot amid Economic Slowdown
  76. Samudrayaan Project
  77. Poshan Abhiyaan
  78. Inner Line Permit
  79. K2-18b — a potentially ‘habitable’ planet
  80. National Animal Disease Control Programme
  81. Anaemia
  82. Participatory Notes
  83. National Pension Scheme for Traders and Self Employed Persons
  84. September 21 Revolution
  85. World Ozone Day
  86. Hog technology in Railways
  87. India’s Red Corridor
  88. What Is the Rome Statute?
  89. India joins global research hub on antimicrobial resistance
  90. NGOs foreign contribution financing
  91. Gharial conservation in India
  92. International migrants and Indian diaspora
  93. Jan Soochna Portal
  94. Marginal Cost of Funds-based Lending Rate (MCLR)
  95. Global spread of measles infection
  96. MGNREGA Wages Linked with Inflation
  97. Particulate matter emissions trading
  98. Public Safety Act
  99. Sant Ravidas–the mystic Guru of Bhakti movement
  100. Critically Endangered Indian Vulture (Gyps indicus)
  101. Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC)
  102. Climate and Clean Air Coalition
  103. Pandit Deendayal Upadhyaya
  104. Zonal Councils
  105. Digital Census
  106. KEELADI – An Urban Settlement of Sangam Age
  107. All India Survey on Higher Education
  108. Caribbean Community and Common Market (CARICOM)
  109. Coastal Regulation Zone
  110. Financial Action Task Force on Money Laundering
  111. Golden Triangle and Golden Crescent
  112. Shifting of tigers
  113. Sagittarius A
  114. Endosulfan
  115. Analgesic
  116. Ganga data collector app
  117. New species of frog discovered in Arunachal
  118. Soay sheep
  119. MOSAIC Mission
  120. Global Goalkeeper Award 2019
  121. World Digital competitiveness ranking 2019
  122. Pollinator Sanctuary: A new sustainable solution model from Canada
  123. Quad Grouping
  124. Prescription for plant-based diet overlooks vitamin B12 deficiency
  125. Double burden of malnutrition
  126. UMMID initiative
  127. The ancient port town of Mamallapuram
  128. Delayed Withdrawal of Monsoon
  129. China’s Continuing Rare Earth Dominance
  130. Dip in growth of core sectors
  131. EC Powers to Reduce/remove Disqualification of MLAs and MPs under RPA
  132. India is now Open Defecation Free
  133. New IPCC report warns of dire threat to ocean
  134. Press Freedom in India
  135. Madhya Pradesh set to get its seventh tiger reserve – Ratapani Tiger Reserve
  136. School Education Quality Index
  137. World Hindu Economic Forum
  138. What is Goldschmidtite?
  139. A peep into the lives of Galo Tribe of Arunachal Pradesh
  140. Bathukamma Festival
  141. INS Nilgiri
  142. Elephant Endotheliotropic herpes virus
  143. National Nutrition Survey
  144. Why Onion prices often shoots up in India?
  145. Mass extinctions
  146. Advanced air pollution warning system
  147. Chalukyas
  148. Electoral Bond Scheme
  149. Guru Nanak Dev
  150. E-Waste Clinic in Madhya Pradesh
  151. Prakash portal
  152. E-Waste Clinic in Madhya Pradesh
  153. Rajasthan has announced the creation of a Pneumoconiosis Fund
  154. Reinventing Border Management: Drone Threat in Border Areas
  155. Semi-presidential system
  156. Strategic Disinvestment
  157. Water management
  158. Interconnect Usage Charge (IUC)
  159. Ramachandran Plot
  160. C40 Cities
  161. 51 Pegasi b
  162. Extinction Rebellion
  163. Military exercises
  164. Kamini Roy
  165. Global Hunger Index
  166. Jayaprakash Narayan
  167. Chenani-Nashri tunnel
  168. Ayushman Bharat scheme empowering several Indians
  169. Chinese President’s Mamallapuram Visit (informal) to India
  170. Food Safety Mitra (FSM) scheme
  171. Geo-engineering
  172. Implications of Nepal-China road connectivity deal
  173. Indus Waters Treaty
  174. Livestock census
  175. National Blindness and Visual Impairment Survey
  176. One Nation One FASTag: Govt’s RFID solution for digital payment of highway toll
  177. Blue Flag Challenge
  178. Chandipura Virus
  179. International Court of Justice (ICJ)
  180. Prevention of tuberculosis
  181. Kaziranga National Park
  182. Mahila Samridhi Yojana
  183. State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World 2019 report
  184. Paramarsh
  185. Polavaram Irrigation Project
  186. Ramanujan Machine
  187. Orchids of India: A Pictorial Guide
  188. Tigers under high stress
  189. Delay in establishment of Human Rights Court
  190. CAG Report on Preparedness for Implementation of Sustainable Development Goals
  191. 5G Debate
  192. Article 35 A
  193. ‘PM Awas Yojana and PRAGATI Platform’
  194. Bio fuel
  195. e-cigarettes
  196. Essential medicines
  197. Electronically Transmitted Postal Ballot System (ETPBS)
  198. Facial recognition
  199. ‘Genome Sequencing’
  200. Global Innovation Index (GII) 2019
  201. India-South Korea
  202. ‘Strength of Supreme Court Judges’
  203. LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory)
  204. ‘Protection of Children from Sexual Offences (Amendment) Bill, 2019’
  205. Kala azar
  206. Tesla-style giga factories
  207. Tiger census
  208. Zero budget natural farming (ZBNF)
  209. Jai Bhim Mukhyamantri Pratibha Vikas Yojana
  210. UN Convention on International Settlement Agreements resulting
  211. Economic Census
  212. Disqualification under Anti-Defection Law
  213. Khanij Bidesh India Ltd
  214. Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR)
  215. ASAT missile
  216. Atal Community Innovation Centre (ACIC) Program
  217. BrahMos cruise missiles
  218. Corporate Social Responsibility
  219. ‘Deforestation in the Amazon rainforest’
  220. Eugenics
  221. ‘Female foeticide’
  222. Global Coalition of the Willing on Pollinators
  223. Indus Valley inscriptions
  224. Jallianwala Bagh National Memorial (Amendment) Bill, 2019
  225. ‘Motor Vehicles (Amendment) Bill 2019’
  226. ‘One Nation One Ration Card Scheme’
  227. Protection of Children from Sexual Offences (Amendment) Bill, 2019
  228. ‘Soil health card’
  229. Tiger census
  230. Triple talaq
  231. Diabetes
  232. Relevance of Wholesale Price Index (WPI)
  233. The State of the World’s Children 2019
  234. BHIM 2.0
  235. Carcinogen Aflatoxin detected in FSSAI milk survey samples
  236. Inter-Parliamentary Union
  237. Jal Jeevan Mission
  238. Maharatna, Navratna and Miniratna CPSEs
  239. Reviving exports
  240. Storm quake
  241. TechSagar
  242. Pegasus Spyware
  243. Annual fishing ban to protect Olive Ridleys in Gahirmatha
  244. Parliamentary reforms
  245. Global Snow Leopard and Ecosystem Program (GSLEP)
  246. The National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB)
  247. Kerala on alert as Maha intensifies into super cyclone off its coast
  248. Stages of Economic Integration
  249. Targeted PMKVY and Skills Framework
  250. Top five largest Ramsar sites in India
  251. Danakil Depression
  252. Deforestation, agriculture triggered soil erosion 4,000 years ago
  253. Enhancing Insurance Coverage for Bank Deposits
  254. ICEDASH AND ATITHI
  255. India International Science Festival (IISF) 2019: Experts advise sustainable, climate-smart, diverse farming
  256. India, Uzbekistan sign three defence MoUs
  257. Moody’s cut India’s rating from stable to negative
  258. National Health Profile
  259. Quantum computing
  260. Steel Scrap Recycling Policy
  261. Wastelands Atlas – 2019
  262. What the toxic air did to Delhiites
  263. Why more measles patients die of other infections
  264. Bru refugees of Mizoram
  265. What is a constitution bench?
  266. Basel Ban Amendment
  267. eSIM
  268. Avian Influenza (H5N1)
  269. Uyghur community
  270. Bonn Challenge
  271. What is Cryodrakon Boreas?
  272. 2 new ginger species
  273. Shanghai Cooperation Organisation (SCO) and Eurasian Economic Union
  274. Gig Economy
  275. Nilgiri Tahr’
  276. Logistics Index Chart
  277. Market Intervention Scheme for Apples of J&K

RPSC RAS/RTS Prelims Exam Rajasthan GK Complete Study Material in English

RPSC RAS/RTS Prelims Exam General Studies Study Material in English. Rajasthan General Knowledge for RPSC RAS and all other competitive exams. we are providing you complete study notes/eBook here.

What you will get?

You will get set of 6-PDF:

  1. Geography of Rajasthan with Practice MCQ
  2. History of Rajasthan with Practice MCQ
  3. Art Culture and Heritage of Rajasthan with Practice MCQ
  4. Rajasthan Polity and Administration with Practice MCQ
  5. Economy of Rajasthan with Practice MCQ
  6. Rajasthan Current Affairs Year Book 2019

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UPSC Civil Services Mains Exam 2020 GS Paper Study Material

UPSC IAS Mains Exam General Studies Paper 1,2,3,4 Complete Study Material in English.

You will get the following Books:

1. UPSC IAS Mains General Studies Paper 1 – Indian Heritage and Culture and History and Geography of the World and Society

2. UPSC IAS Mains General Studies Paper 2 – Governance, Constitution, Polity, Social Justice and International Relations

3. UPSC IAS Mains General Studies Paper 3 – Technology, Economic Development, Bio Diversity, Environment, Security and Disaster Management

4. UPSC IAS Mains General Studies Paper 4 – Ethics, Integrity and Aptitude

Click Here to download the Complete Study Notes for UPSC Mains Exam GS Paper 1-4.

The Union Public Service Commission (UPSC) conducts IAS Mains Examinations with an aim to assess the overall intellectual traits and depth of understanding of the candidates aspiring to be a part of the coveted Indian Civil Services. The IAS Mains Examinations test much more that the mere range of information and memory of the aspirants. These 2020 completely revised editions of study guides for General Studies Papers consist of in-depth coverage of all the topics in the syllabi at one place with the conceptual clarity to fulfill the needs and demands of the aspirants.

The present box set contains books for IAS Mains General Studies Paper 1, IAS Mains General Studies Paper 2, IAS Mains General Studies Paper 3 and IAS Mains General Studies Paper 4.These books have been designed according to the syllabus for IAS Mains General Studies Paper 1, IAS Mains General Studies Paper 2, IAS Mains General Studies Paper 3 and IAS Mains General Studies Paper 4. The books have been designed with a special exam-oriented structure in accordance with the UPSC syllabus. We have have designed on the lines of questions asked in previous years’ IAS Mains General Studies exams. As the combination contains in-depth coverage of the various aspects of Indian Heritage and Culture and History and Geography of the World and Society, Governance, Constitution, Polity, Social Justice and International Relations, Technology, Economic Development, Bio Diversity, Environment, Security and Disaster Management and Ethics, Integrity and Aptitude along with a freebie to help the aspirants master their essay writing skills, it for sure will prove to be an impeccable resource for the upcoming IAS Mains Exam General Studies Papers 2020.

UPSC Civil Services Preliminary Exam 2020 GS Paper-1 Complete Study Material

UPSC IAS Preliminary Exam 2020 Complete Study Material in PDF Format

Date of Notification for Civil Service Prelims and Indian Forest Service Prelims: February 12, 2020

Last date to apply for Civil Service Prelims and Indian Forest Service Prelims: March 03, 2020

Date of UPSC CSE Prelims 2020 and IFS Prelims 2020: May 31, 2020

Date of UPSC CSE Mains 2020: September 18, 2020

UPSC IAS Prelims 2020 Syllabus:

Current events of national and international importance

History of India and Indian National Movement

Indian Geography-Physical, Social, Economic Geography of India

Indian Polity and Governance-Constitution, Political System, Panchayati Raj, Public Policy, Rights Issues, etc.

Economic and Social Development-Sustainable Development, Poverty, Inclusion, Demographics, Social Sector Initiatives, etc

General issues on Environmental ecology, Bio-diversity and Climate Change – that do not require subject specialization

General Science

We are providing here the study material for UPSC IAS Prelims 2020

What You Will Get?

You will get Set of 18 PDF

  1. Ancient and Medieval History of India
  2. Modern History of India
  3. Indian Art and Culture
  4. Indian Polity and Constitution
  5. Physical, Economic and Human Geography of India
  6. Environment and Ecology
  7. Indian Economy
  8. Science and Technology
  9. Current Affairs Year Book 2020 Volume-1
  10. Current Affairs Year Book 2020 Volume -2
  11. NCERT Geography Class 6-12th MCQ Compilation
  12. NCERT Polity Class 6-12th MCQ Compilation
  13. Geography and Environment Current Affairs issue
  14. Science and Technology Current Affairs issue
  15. Polity and Governance Current Affairs issue
  16. Indian Year Book 2020 MCQ
  17. UPSC IAS Prelims Previous Year (10 Year-2010 to 2019)Solved Paper
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Rajasthan Patwari Bharti Pariksha 2019 General study notes with 1000+ Question Answer

राजस्थान पटवारी भर्ती परीक्षा 2019 सामान्य अध्ययन एवं प्रैक्टिस 1000 + Question Answer

राजस्थन पटवारी Syllabus 2019: Prelims, Mains Exam Pattern in Hindi & English PDF

Are you searching Rajasthan Patwari 2019 Syllabus, Book, Notes, Guide Magazine, PDF and Previous Paper? Then, this is the best place to get actual results for your search. Here we have given detailed RSMSSB Patwari Pre, Mains Exam pattern & syllabus in Hindi PDF. You can also check for exam dates, cut off percentage, study material, previous papers details in the below sections of the article. However, continue reading the entire article to gather all the information provided. It will be very informatics and useful for your exam 2019-20.

Rajasthan Subordinate Ministerial Services Selection Board released a notification for recruiting Approximate 5000 Patwari vacancies. Many candidates appear for this exam so it is expected that competition will be high this time as well, applicants need to have proper guidelines & study materials to score good marks in the exam.

Here we have updated the latest RSMSSB syllabus & exam pattern details subject wise. Aspirants can also download official syllabus PDF both in Hindi & English by using the link given in the bottom section of the article.

RSMSSB Patwari Exam 2019 – www.rsmssb.rajasthan.gov.in

Description Details
Organization Name Rajasthan Subordinate Ministerial Services Selection Board (RSMSSB)
Post Name Patwari
Vacancies Approx. 5000
Category Syllabus
Rajasthan Patwari Exam Date Update Soon
Official Site www.rsmssb.rajasthan.gov.in

The selection of the applicant for Patwari post is based on Prelims, Mains written exam followed by an interview process. Certainly, check for exam pattern and syllabus PDF details below.

Rajasthan (RSMSSB) Patwari Exam Syllabus & New Pattern 2019

This exam pattern gives you a rough idea about the structure of the exam, the number of questions asked, marks allotted and other norms of the exam. The exam pattern is given for both prelims and mains stages in the below table along with the required details of the exam.

Subjects Level of Exam Questions Marks
General Knowledge 10+2/senior Secondary level 100
Mathematics, Reasoning 10+Secondary level 100
General Hindi 10+2/senior Secondary level 50
Computer Basics Basic Computer Knowledge 50

RSMSSB Rajasthan Patwari Mains Syllabus & Exam Pattern

Subjects Exam Level Questions Marks
General Knowledge (GK) Senior Secondary Level 50 100
General Hindi Senior Secondary level 25 50
Mathematics, Reasoning Secondary level 50 100
Basic Computer Knowledge Computer Basics 25 50
Total 150 300
  • The exam will be of objective type questions.
  • There will be 150 multiple-choice questions.
  • Duration of exam will be 3 Hours.
  • Negative marking of 1/3rd marks will be there for each wrong answer.
  • Each question carries 2 marks.

 The syllabus is given in the subject wise from which questions will be asked considering both Prelims & Mains exam. Applicants searching for the updated syllabus can go through below list of topics that need to be studied to crack the exam successfully.

RSMSSB Patwari Mathematics Syllabus

  • Average
  • simplification
  • Profit & loss
  • SI & CI
  • Trigonometry
  • Partnership
  • Percentage
  • Ratio & proportion
  • Field book
  • Mensuration
  • Height & distance etc.

राजस्थान पटवारी गणित सिलेबस 

  • त्रिकोणमिति
  • साझेदारी
  • प्रतिशत
  • अनुपात और अनुपात
  • औसत
  • फील्ड बुक
  • क्षेत्रमिति
  • सरलीकरण
  • लाभ हानि
  • एसआई और सीआई
  • ऊँचाई और दूरी आदि

 Rajasthan Patwari Syllabus for General Knowledge

  • Current Affairs of Country and State
  • Indian politics
  • Schemes of state government
  • Literature & culture of Rajasthan
  • Geography and history of Rajasthan
  • Knowledge of District, Local and state level administration
  • Land measurement etc.

राजस्थान पटवारी सामान्य ज्ञान पाठ्यक्रम

  • राज्य सरकार की योजनाएं
  • राजस्थान की साहित्य और संस्कृति
  • देश और राज्य के वर्तमान मामलों
  • भारतीय राजनीति
  • जिला, स्थानीय और राज्य स्तर प्रशासन का ज्ञान
  • भूमि माप आदि
  • राजस्थान के भूगोल और इतिहास

www.rsmssb.rajasthan.gov.in Patwari Syllabus for Hindi

  • Idioms & phrases
  • Synonyms
  • Antonyms
  • Paragraph
  • Error correction
  • Noun-Pronoun Adjective, adverb
  • Punctuation
  • General Hindi grammar etc

राजस्थान पटवारी परीक्षा के लिए पाठ्यक्रम – हिंदी में

  • मुहावरे और वाक्यांशों
  • समानार्थक शब्द
  • विलोम शब्द
  • अनुच्छेद
  • गलतीयों का सुधार
  • नाम Pronoun विशेषण, क्रियाविशेषण
  • विराम चिह्न
  • सामान्य हिंदी व्याकरण आदि

Click Here to download Patwari exam Book

राजस्थान पटवारी भर्ती परीक्षा 2019 सामान्य अध्ययन एवं प्रैक्टिस 1000 + Question Answer


राजस्थान पुलिस, ग्राम सेवक एवं सभी प्रतियोगी परीक्षा हेतु उपयोगी

राजस्थान सामान्य अध्ययन:नोट्स एवं अभ्यास 1000+प्रश्नोत्तर

General Studies of Rajasthan-All in One

राजस्थान सामान्य अध्ययन:नोट्स एवं अभ्यास 1000+प्रश्नोत्तर

UPSC IAS Prelims Exam – 2020

UPSC IAS Mains Exam – 2019

RPSC RAS Prelims Exam

RPSC RAS Mains Exam

General Knowledge

Current Affairs

Rajasthan General Knowledge: Samanya Gyan:All in One:Important Notes:with MCQ

Rajasthan GK Book in Hindi covered all subject and useful for RPSC, RAS/RTS, AEn, Lecturer, Patwar, RSMSSB and All other Competitive Exams.

It covers Itihasa (History), Bhoogol (Geography), Arthavyavastha (Economy), Rajavyavastha (Polity), Kala-Sanskriti (Art-Culture) of the State (Rajasthan). Well-researched study-material is studded with tables, boxes and maps with Solved MCQ

Topic Covered:

राजस्थान का सामान्य परिचय

राजस्थान की स्थिति, विस्तार, आकृति एवं भौतिक स्वरूप

राजस्थान की सीमा

राजस्थान के संभाग

राजस्थान के प्रतीक चिन्ह

राजस्थान की जलवायु

मानसून (Monsoon) in Rajasthan

राजस्थान के भौतिक विभाग

राजस्थान के विभिन्न क्षेत्रों के भौगोलिक नाम

राजस्थान की झीले

राजस्थान की नदियां

राजस्थान की सिचाई परियोजनाऐं

प्राचीन सभ्यताऐं

राजस्थान का इतिहास जानने के स्त्रोत

गुर्जर प्रतिहार वंश

राजपूत युग

आमेर का कछवाह वंश

सांभर का चौहान वंश

मारवाड का राठौड वंश

बीकानेर का राठौड़ वंश

1857 की क्रान्ति

राजस्थान में किसान आन्दोलन

राजस्थान में प्रजामण्डल

राजस्थान का एकीकरण

राजस्थान जनगणना व साक्षरता – 2011

वन

वन्य जीव अभ्यारण्य

राजस्थान में कृषि

पशु सम्पदा

खनिज संसाधन

राजस्थान में ऊर्जा विकास

राजस्थान में औद्योगिक विकास

राजस्थान में वित्तीय संगठन

राजस्थान में पर्यटन विकास

राजस्थान में लोक देवता

राजस्थान में लोक देवियां

राजस्थान में सम्प्रदाय

राजस्थान में त्यौहार

राजस्थान के मेले

राजस्थान में प्रचलित रीति -रिवाज & प्रथाएं

आभूषण और वेशभूषा

राजस्थान की जनजातियां

राजस्थान के दुर्ग

भारत की प्रमुख संगीत गायन शैलियां

राजस्थान में नृत्य

राजस्थान में लोकनाट्य

वाद्य यंत्र

प्रमुख वादक

राजस्थान की चित्र शैलियां

लोक कलाएं

राजस्थान के लोकगीत

राजस्थान में हस्तकला

छतरियां , महल &हवेलियां

राजस्थान के प्रमुख सांस्कृतिक कार्यक्रम स्थल

राजस्थानी भाषा एवं बोलियां

राजस्थान मंत्रिमंडल और मंत्रियों के विभाग

राजस्थान में परिवहन

राजस्थान की प्रमुख योजनाएं

राजस्थान की मिट्टियाँ

शिक्षा

राजस्थान में पंचायती राज व्यवस्था

लोकसभा चुनाव-2019

राजस्थान राज्य से राज्यसभा सदस्य

राजस्थानन लोक सेवा आयोग

राजस्थान के महत्वपूर्ण पदाधिकारी

परिवर्तित बजट 2019-20

आर्थिक समीक्षा 2017-18

लेखानुदान 2019-20

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Physical, Economic and Human Geography of India

India has a varied landscape. From the snow-clad Himalayas to rich, vibrant coastlines, we probably have all the physio graphic features of an environment. However, before we get into that, let us first understand India’s location on the world map. India is a part of the Asian continent and lies on the Indian Plate.

India has a total area of 3,287,263 square kilometers and that makes it the seventh largest country in the world. The Himalayan range defines the north of India and the Arabian Sea, the Bay of Bengal, and the Indian Ocean define the southern part. India shares its borders with China, Bhutan, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Myanmar (Burma).

Topic Covered:-

Indian Geography: A Complete Study Material

  1. Introduction
    o Basic Concepts in Geography
    o The Universe
    o The Solar System
    o Latitudes, Longitudes and Standard Time
    o Inside our Earth
    o Our Changing Earth
    o Composition of Air
    o Water
    o Our Changing view of the Universe
    o Location and its Neighbour
    o Frontiers of India
    o Administrative divisions of India: States and Union Territories
    o Physical Division
    o Geological Structure of India
    o Classification of the Indian Rocks
    o Trans-Himalayas Mountain Region or Tibet Himalayan Region
    o The Eastern or Purvanchal Hills
    o The Aravali Mountain Range
    o The Peninsular Plateau
    o The Great Plains of India
    o Structural division of Plains
    o Indian Desert
    o The Western Ghats Mountain Range
    o The Eastern Ghats Mountain Range
    o The Western Ghats Coastal Plain
    o The Eastern Coastal Plains
    o The Island Groups
    o Important Passes in India
  2. Climate, Soil & Vegetation
  3. Drainage System/River/Lake
  4. Economic Geography
    – Industrial Regions in India
    – Mineral belts in India
    – Power Resources of India
    – Coal Resources of India
    – Petroleum and Natural Gas
    – Atomic Minerals
    – Means of Electrical Energy Production in India
    – Atomic Energy
    – Non-Conventional Sources of Energy
    – Industries in India
    – Industrial Development in India
    – Iron and Steel Industry
    – Shipping Industry
    – Aluminium Industries in India
    – Cement Industry
    – Chemical fertilizer Industry in India
    – Petro-Chemical Industry in India
    – Engineering Industry
    – Pharmaceutical Industries in India
    – Agro-Based Industries in India
    – Forest-based Industry
    – Transport and Communication
    – Road Transport
    – Rail Transport
    – Water Transport
    – Air Transportation
    – Oil and Gas Pipelines
    – Personal Communication System
    – Mass Communication System
  5. Human Geography
    – Human Resources
    – Human Development
    – Human Settlement
    – Rural Settlement
    – Indicators of Development
    – Composition of Indian population
    – Urban Settlements in India
    – Urbanization in India
    – Functional Classification of Towns
    – Dichotomy of Human Geography
    – Human Development Index in India
    – Racial Groups of India
    – Schedule Tribes in India
    – Schedule Castes in India
    – Population Policies of India
    – Human Migration

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General Studies of Rajasthan-All in One

Where globalization means as it so often does that the rich and powerful now have new means to further enrich and empower themselves at the cost of the poorer and weaker, we have a responsibility to protect in the name of universal freedom – Nelson Mandela

Preface

It gives me immense pleasure in presenting the first edition of the General studies of Rajasthan, useful for the students of Graduate and the candidates appearing in Rajasthan Competitive Examinations conducted by RPSC and Rajasthan Subordinate Board, Universities and Government Departments.

This book deals with the relevant features and topics of General studies of Rajasthan in a systematic and comprehensive manner by the use of simple and concise language for easy and quick understanding. Varied subjects covered are Geography, History, Art-Culture & Heritage, Polity & Administration and Economy of Rajasthan in detailed with subject wise solved practice questions. I hope that the readers will find this book user friendly and helpful in preparation of their examinations. I look forwarded to have the views, comment, suggestions and criticism from readers which would definitely help in further improvement of the Book. I would like to heartfelt thanks to all my friends, family members, Shri Kishan Diwliwal and the team members of Shubham Publishers and distributors for their effort to publishing this book.

Wish you happy reading and best wishes for the examinations.

Features of the Book:

  1. General Studies of Rajasthan-All in One, it covered the syllabus of RPSC and University exams.
  2. Subject wise detailed study material with practice question answer
  3. This book covered Geography, History, Polity, Economy and Art-Culture of Rajasthan.
  4. You can buy this book from anywhere in Rajasthan at district level or from Most of the shop in Jaipur (Rajasthan).
  5. Very soon it will be available on Amazon, Flip-kart etc.
General Studies of Rajasthan

Click Here – Buy/Order at home

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